JEFFREY J. GILLIS-DAVIS* --- HAWAI`I INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA.

Jeffrey J. Gillis-Davis*

Faculty
Assistant Researcher

University of Hawai`i at Manoa
Hawai`i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology
1680 East-West Road, POST 602
Honolulu, HI 96822

tel. 808-956-5738
fax. 808-956-6322
gillis@higp.hawaii.edu

Research Interests
The geology of Mercury and the Moon, volcanology, crustal composition, remote sensing and using experimental petrology along with space weathering experiments to improve results from remotely sensed data.

Current Projects
Mercury:
I am a participating scientist on NASA's Mercury Surface Space ENvironment GEochemistry and Ranging or MESSENGER mission.  I use multispectral imagery from Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Wide-Angle Camera (WAC) to investigate the diversity of rock types that comprise Mercury
's surface and the high-resolution imagery from the MDIS Narrow-Angle Camera (NAC) to search for landforms that are characteristic of volcanism.  Of particular interest are pit craters, which could be possible indicators of shallow igneous activity on Mercury.  This work is helping to reveal the geologic details of the innermost planet.

The Moon:
I use a combination of sample analysis, remote sensing, and photogeology to address problems in lunar science. My most recent work includes studying the origin and geologic evolution of volcanism on the Moon. To this end I examine and classify basalt deposits (maria) by multiple criteria, some of which include age, geologic setting, morphology, distribution, thickness, volume, spectral characteristics, and composition. I am particularly interested in understanding causes of the global dichotomy in distribution and composition between mare basalts on the far side versus those on the near side of the Moon.  As a participating scientist on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) I will use data from the Mini-RF to investigate pyroclastic deposits as resource (e.g. volatile material and habitat shielding) and science (e.g., may contain mantle xenoliths) potential.  Mini-RF radar data will also be used to improve the correlation between ultraviolet-visible spectral parameters and TiO2 content in the maria.

List of Publications

PDF Copies of Recent Abstracts

My HIGP Personnal Web Page

Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP)

School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology (SOEST)

University of Hawaii at Manoa


*The scientist formerly known as Jeffrey J. Gillis




Last revised:
12-March-2009